Running in Florence: Corri la Vita, Sunday, September 24

Autumn in Florence brings many positive things to mind: sagre, olio nuovo, vendemmie, and for me, the Corri la Vita, the most important charity run in all of Italy, which takes place the third Sunday in September every year since it began in 2003. Proceeds from the race benefit LILT Firenze, which is the Florence branch of the Italian League for the Fight against Cancer.

I first ran the Corri la Vita in 2010 when I had just arrived in Florence as a student. I wanted to participate in something that would help me get to know some locals and feel like an active participant in my adopted city. It was actually the second race I had ever registered for (the former being the Charleston, SC Cooper River Bridge Run), and I remember being really nervous but also really excited. I wholeheartedly recommend to students in Florence that they participate in this exciting event!! And if you don’t plan on participating, don’t bother trying to move around the city. We’re all involved!

This year’s 11 km race begins and ends in Piazza Vittorio Veneto. Registration is open until September 22: for EUR 10 you receive an official Salvatore Ferragamo T-shirt and bib number; for EUR 15 you can receive a bib number with microchip to register your race time.

Last year the race hosted over 35,000 participants and raised EUR 550,000.

You can download the registration form here and bring it to any of the following registration points:

LILT Firenze Viale D. Giannotti, 23 – Firenze, tel. 055 576939
Firenze Marathon Viale Fanti, 2 – Firenze, tel. 055 5522957
L’Isolotto dello Sport Via dell’Argingrosso, 69 A/B – Firenze
Universo Sport Piazza Duomo, 6/r – Firenze

See you in the Piazza on the morning of the race!

 

Rientrata a Firenze and it feels …

After nearly moving to Madrid never to be seen in Florence again, I am indeed back and extremely happy to return to some semblance of normalcy and routine. We are, after all, creatures of habit (for better or worse) and while I can travel bohemian style with the best of them, a month is almost too long.

El tapeo se acabó

Summer is still going strong in Firenze. The weather is hot and the tourists are here in full force. The season won’t really end until mid-November, but for those of us that live here, the end of August is usually a very rude awakening. The Italians call it the sindrome del rientro and it is very real. I’m back to work at the University, while at the same time trying to study as much as possible (ahem, FOCUS) for when I choose my next adventure.

I spent some time at the Uva Nera yesterday — a super cute wine bar with reliable wifi — great for working remotely. Located on Borgo Ognissanti, it is situated just past the Polimoda fashion school, walking from school towards the center of town, so they receive a lot of student traffic. Since I was behind the bar when some students came in, we got to talking, and I was able to share some of my experience living in Florence with them. They were really disappointed to learn I was American and speak perfect English!

Both when speaking to Lisa May and in my experience working with students traveling abroad for the first time, many people wonder how to become integrated in their adopted community: how do I get the locals not to speak to me in English? How do you make friends? How do you get your barista to finally say hello?

Needless to say the conversation got me thinking about the advice I’ve given students over the years: CONSISTENCY IS KEY. I believe that if you just do what you love, wherever you are, you will naturally make friends without stressing yourself out about doing it the “right” way. I love running and having a cheap drink at aperitivo, so lo and behold no matter where in the world I go, I tend to meet runners and revelers! And if you find a trail, park, basketball court, museum, bookstore, cafe, whatever it is that you love, and a habit of dedicating some time consistently to that space or activity, you will undoubtedly notice that the locals become curious about you.

For me it’s back to work but for so many students it’s their first time here, so best of luck this semester or year abroad. Fearlessly refuse to speak English and you will leave Florence with an enhanced Italian vocabulary for sure.

How do you like to get the feel for a place? What’s the first thing you do when you go somewhere new?

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